Update the eclass to use "fixed UIDs... with random fallback."
authorMichael Orlitzky <michael@orlitzky.com>
Sun, 29 Jan 2017 23:21:34 +0000 (18:21 -0500)
committerMichael Orlitzky <michael@orlitzky.com>
Sun, 29 Jan 2017 23:21:34 +0000 (18:21 -0500)
eclass/sys-user.eclass

index 65b731f69ab294d3c3f880c0bf5411c440c3a422..549e8b38aae57040f8caf6ff2f8cf977d77d3a05 100644 (file)
 
 inherit user
 
-EXPORT_FUNCTIONS src_unpack src_prepare src_configure src_compile src_install src_test pkg_preinst pkg_postinst pkg_prerm
+EXPORT_FUNCTIONS pkg_pretend src_unpack src_configure src_compile src_install src_test pkg_preinst pkg_postinst pkg_prerm
 
-# This is hard-coded to the package name. If you want a different
-# username, use a different package name. This is a nice way to prevent
-# different people from claiming the same username.
+: ${HOMEPAGE:="https://www.gentoo.org/"}
+: ${DESCRIPTION:="The ${PN} system user"}
+: ${LICENSE:="GPL-2"}
+
+# If you want a different username, use a different package name. This
+# prevents different people from claiming the same username.
 SYS_USER_NAME="${PN}"
 
 # @ECLASS-VARIABLE: SYS_USER_GROUPS
@@ -25,9 +28,16 @@ SYS_USER_NAME="${PN}"
 : ${SYS_USER_GROUPS:=${PN}}
 
 # @ECLASS-VARIABLE: SYS_USER_UID
+# @REQUIRED
 # @DESCRIPTION:
 # etc. (use -1 to get next available using user.eclass)
-: ${SYS_USER_UID:=-1}
+[[ -z "${SYS_USER_UID}" ]] && die "SYS_USER_UID must be set"
+
+# @ECLASS-VARIABLE: SYS_USER_UID_IMPORTANT
+# @REQUIRED
+# @DESCRIPTION:
+# Set to "true" if you want to die() if you don't get your desired UID.
+: ${SYS_USER_UID_IMPORTANT:=false}
 
 # In many cases, if the UID of a user changes, packages depending on it
 # will want to rebuild. We always use SLOT=0, because you can't install
@@ -61,8 +71,6 @@ unset _group
 S="${WORKDIR}"
 
 sys-user_src_unpack() { :; }
-sys-user_src_prepare() { :; }
-sys-user_src_configure() { :; }
 sys-user_src_compile() { :; }
 sys-user_src_test() { :; }
 
@@ -78,23 +86,50 @@ sys-user_next_uid() {
        fi
 }
 
-sys-user_src_prepare() {
-       eapply_user # whatever
+sys-user_pkg_pretend() {
+       # Sanity checks that would otherwise run code in global scope.
+       #
+       # First ensure that the user didn't say his UID is important and
+       # then fail to specify one.
+       if (( "${SYS_USER_UID}" == -1 )) &&
+                  [[ "${SYS_USER_UID_IMPORTANT}" == "true" ]]; then
+               # Don't make no damn sense.
+               die "arbitrary UID requested with SYS_USER_UID_IMPORTANT=true"
+       fi
+
+       # Next ensure that no other username owns an important UID.
+       if [[ "${SYS_USER_UID_IMPORTANT}" == "true" ]]; then
+               # Ok, the UID is important. Make sure nobody else has it. Or
+               # rather, nobody else *with a different username* has it.
+               local oldname=$(egetent passwd "${SYS_USER_UID}" | cut -f1 -d':')
+               if [[ "${SYS_USER_NAME}" != "${oldname}" ]]; then
+                       die "important UID ${SYS_USER_UID} already belongs to ${oldname}"
+               fi
+       fi
+
+       # Finally, ensure that this username doesn't already exist with
+       # another UID if its UID is supposedly important.
+       if [[ -n $(egetent passwd "${SYS_USER_NAME}") ]]; then
+               local olduid=$(id --real --user "${SYS_USER_NAME}")
+               if [[ "${SYS_USER_UID_IMPORTANT}" == "true" ]] && \
+                          [[ "${SYS_USER_UID}" != "${olduid}" ]]; then
+                       # The UID is important and specified, but there is already a
+                       # system user with this name and a different UID. Halp.
+                       die "user ${SYS_USER_NAME} already exists with UID ${olduid}"
+               fi
+       fi
+}
 
+sys-user_src_configure() {
        if [[ -n $(egetent passwd "${SYS_USER_NAME}") ]]; then
                # UPGRADE PATH: This user already exists, so if the eclass
                # consumer doesn't care about some settings, we can reuse the
                # pre-existing ones.
                #
-               # This is also useful for sys-user package upgrades, becaused it
-               # prevents us from incrementing the UID pointlessly on a
-               # reinstall. Usually that will prevent rebuilds of depending
-               # packages, and is crucial to our ability to use subslot deps to
-               # cause rebuilds when the UID changes. We don't want the UID to
-               # change if the subslot doesn't change, and the subslot for "I
-               # don't care about the UID" will always be "-1", so the UID
-               # shouldn't generally change either when SYS_USER_UID=-1.
-               if (( "${SYS_USER_UID}" == -1 )); then
+               # This is also useful for sys-user package upgrades, because it
+               # prevents us from incrementing the UID on a reinstall, and doing
+               # so would break most packages that need a system user to exist.
+               if [[ "${SYS_USER_UID_IMPORTANT}" != "true" ]]; then
                        SYS_USER_UID=$(id --real --user "${SYS_USER_NAME}")
                fi
 
@@ -118,9 +153,6 @@ sys-user_src_prepare() {
                # UID, so pick the next one.
                SYS_USER_UID=$(sys-user_next_uid)
        fi
-
-       # We do something with this in src_install.
-       touch "${T}/${SYS_USER_UID}" || die
 }
 
 sys-user_src_install() {
@@ -132,14 +164,10 @@ sys-user_src_install() {
        #
        # Beware, this only works if SYS_USER_UID is guaranteed to have a
        # real UID and not, for example, -1. That is taken care of in
-       # src_prepare() for now.
+       # src_configure() for now.
+       touch "${T}/${SYS_USER_UID}" || die
        insinto "/var/lib/sys-user"
        doins "${T}/${SYS_USER_UID}"
-
-       # TODO: do we want to try to create the user's home directory within
-       # the package manager so that it can be cleaned up later? The
-       # obvious problem with that plan is that we need to be careful not
-       # to give the new user ownership of e.g. /dev/null.
 }
 
 sys-user_pkg_preinst() {
@@ -154,46 +182,39 @@ sys-user_pkg_preinst() {
                                 "${SYS_USER_GROUPS}" \
                        || die "failed to add user ${SYS_USER_NAME}"
        elif [[ -n "${REPLACING_VERSIONS}" ]]; then
-                # This is an upgrade from an existing sys-user package. This
-                # case is a little bit weird. If we do it in preinst(), then it
-                # will happen before the "old" user is removed in
-                # pkg_prerm(). Except the old user and the new user are the
-                # same, so if we overwrite the existing user here, then prerm
-                # for the version that created it will clobber our new entry.
-                #
-                # We also can't just LEAVE the old user there, because then no
-                # upgrade happens.
-                #
-                # Uh, let's do this case in pkg_postinst so that it happens
-                # after the old version's prerm.
-                :
+               #
+               # This case is done in pkg_postint() to avoid clobbering a
+               # new user when we remove the old one.
+               #
+               :
        else
                # UPGRADE PATH: Ok, the user exists but this isn't an upgrade of
                # a sys-user package. This is the upgrade path from the old
-               # style of user/group management to the new style. What can we
-               # do? We could make it policy that old users must be compatible
-               # with the new ones, but that entails hard-coding UIDs that
-               # don't need to be hard-coded.
+               # style of user/group management to the new style. Lets see if
+               # the new user is compatible with the old one; it usually will be.
+               # We only bail out if there's a homedir or shell conflict.
+               #
+               # We should make it policy that new sys-user packages have the
+               # same homedir and shell as the existing ones created by
+               # ebuilds, but it can't hurt to check again here. These checks
+               # are done here (and not in pkg_pretend, where they would be
+               # more consistent) because the PMS states that REPLACING_VERSIONS
+               # may not be defined there.
                #
-               # Instead lets see if the new user is compatible with the old
-               # (it usually will be), and then only bail out if there's a real
-               # problem.
+               # If a homedir/shell changes during a sys-user upgrade, we don't
+               # consider that a problem, because the change was knowingly made
+               # by a developer who just edited an ebuild to make that change.
                local oldhome=$(egethome "${SYS_USER_NAME}")
                local oldshell=$(egetshell "${SYS_USER_NAME}")
-               local olduid=$(id --real --user "${SYS_USER_NAME}")
 
-               if [[ "${oldhome}" -ne "${SYS_USER_HOME}" ]]; then
+               if [[ "${oldhome}" != "${SYS_USER_HOME}" ]]; then
                        die "home directory conflict for new user ${SYS_USER_HOME}"
                fi
 
-               if [[ "${oldhshell}" -ne "${SYS_USER_SHELL}" ]]; then
+               if [[ "${oldhshell}" != "${SYS_USER_SHELL}" ]]; then
                        die "shell conflict for new user ${SYS_USER_HOME}"
                fi
 
-               if [[ "${olduid}" -ne "${SYS_USER_UID}" ]]; then
-                       die "UID conflict for new user ${SYS_USER_NAME}"
-               fi
-
                # The user already exists, so all we have left to do is to try
                # to append SYS_USER_GROUPS to the existing groups. The "usermod"
                # tool expects a comma-separated list, so change our spaces to